Search

Six Adjustments Men Can Make to Improve Their Health

Although the COVID-19 pandemic has shown the importance of staying in control of our health throughout the year, there are populations with a greater need for access to information about health.


According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the health status of 13.2% of men age 18 and older is fair or poor. During Men's Health Month, several international organizations encourage men to get regular check-ups and visit the doctor to improve their health and well-being.



In celebration of Men's Health Week this year, the Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Office of Minority Health (OMH) is sharing a series of recommendations for men to be “on top of the game” when it comes to their health care.


1. Protect your Heart


Heart disease is the leading cause of death in men. Choose foods that help you have a healthy heart: let fruits and vegetables fill half of your plate.


2. You don't have to be lifting weights (only)


Studies show that just 30 minutes of exercise a day can give you a healthier, longer life. This doesn't mean you can't get more physical activity time, but don't stress if you stay in that half-hour range daily.


3. Get preventive checkups


Regular exams can catch small problems before they become big ones. Try to know your history of pre-existing conditions in your family —diabetes, cancer, hypertension and others. Ask your doctor to carry out preventive checkups appropriate to your age at least twice a year.


4. It’s time to quit smoking


Smoking causes cancer, heart disease, stroke... an increased risk of erectile dysfunction. If you smoke, it's time to quit.


5. Hey, are you ok?


Life is complicated and discussing your problems with a mental health professional can help. Emotional health is also health and affects your overall well-being. Keep it in check!


6. We are vaccine ready


Getting vaccinated against COVID-19 helps the body build immunity against the disease. Keep wearing a mask, washing your hands and staying six feet away from others, and get vaccinated when it's your turn. To learn more about vaccination based on your age, city, and clinical status, visit the CDC's website here.


Being up to date on your health is key to maintaining a healthy, full and well-being life.

 

*Sources: US Department of Health & Human Services, Office of Minority Health / CDC.gov

3 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All